PROSTHETICS (architectural)

  • Laid brick and cinder block walls are sturdy, ubiquitous, and show obvious grids inherent to the material. Voids can be made or found in the walls, serving as foundations for further designed forms. Furniture unified with the architecture in this way is efficient and stable. Additionally, changes to the bricks themselves make it easy to attach shelves, planters, clocks, lights, and other objects to the wall in order to quickly decorate a room and prepare it for inhabiting.
  • turning cinder blocks out from the wall reveals their voids...
  • ...which can be used to anchor furniture fast to the wall
  • a brick can be replaced by wood of the same dimension
  • several rows of bricks can be spanned to create a bookshelf
  • a metal unit can be used to lash objects to the wall
  • any product with two pegs can plug into this brick
  • a french cleat is a simple and strong means of attachment
  • A handful of redesigns for timber-frame construction. This building method is found all over, and has a lot of potential beyond what it is used for. By changing the profile of the studs, a line of products can be designed to very easily attach to the wall, without needing any tools or hardware. A simple graphic application to drywall using chalkboard paint and neat, evenly spaced screws makes it easy for a user to sketch out ideas for "built-in" furniture
  • repeating this groove would allow thick dowels to span between studs for things to hang from
  • peg-and-hole fastening is a simple lego-esque solution
  • french cleats have proven themselves over the ages as a top-notch mounting method
    repeating this groove would allow thick dowels to span between studs for things to hang from
     
     
  • a bold but elegant chalkboard grid
  • the graphic shows stud locations, between which is plenty of space